Category Archives: experimental

INDIE MUSIC SCENE & NATIVE AMERICA COME TOGETHER TO WELCOME ALTERNATIVE NORWEGIAN SÁMI BAND, ADJÁGAS, TO THE UNITED STATES FOR A TWO-WEEK MINI-TOUR

United States—The acclaimed alternative folk band from the Arctic of Norway, Adjágas, is set to have their introductory tour across the United States beginning July 3 and continuing through July 16. Supporting Adjágas are some of the best independent bands America has to offer, in part to welcome them here for their first tour across the States and also to show support for the culture of the indigenous people of the Scandinavian Arctic, the Sámi people. Along the way, Native American communities and musicians will also greet their European cousins to Indian Country. The two-week tour, which begins in Los Angeles and ends in New York City the first two weeks of July celebrates Adjágas ability to cross world-bridges in both culture and sound with the independent music scene and our indigenous heritages.

Adjágas is Sara Marielle Gaup and Lawra Somby—joikers (from the word joik, pronounced “yoik” and is a combination of singing and chanting) of Sámi origin from Norway. Both are backed by an experimental folk band. Joining Adjágas tour is Max Crawford on trumpet and banjo (of Poi Dog Pondering, the Archer Prewitt band and Wilco recordings). Joiking is an integral part of Sámi history, tradition and culture and bands as well known as The Sea & Cake,  Ethan Gold and Native musicians including Blackfire and Brent Greenwood, are coming together to support Adjágas by sharing double-billed acts in their hometowns.

On July 3, Adjágas will have a concert at the Hotel Café in Los Angeles with Ethan Gold whose recent album “Songs From A Toxic Apartment” received rave reviews from music journals such as Pitchfork and Glide magazines for his combined natural and electronic sounds including string sections and synthesizers. Opening for the main acts are Too Cute To Kill from Oklahoma, Willem Broad (of the FIM band) and Archer Black from L.A. The globally known Navajo punk rock band, Blackfire, will welcome Adjágas to their hometown of Flagstaff, Arizona where they will host a community event at the Taala Hooghan and again at the Navajo Nation Museum in Window Rock on July 7. Adjágas will then travel to Santa Fe and perform for an art installation project, “The Due Return” at the Center for Contemporary Art. In Oklahoma on July 10, Adjágas will share the stage with Oklahoma’s Deerpeople and Fiawna Forté, two bands that recently graced the 2011 SXSW Film and Music Festival as part of Oklahoma’s music showcase at the Buffalo Lounge. Ponca powwow singer, Brent Greenwood, Adjágas and Fiawna Forté will also have unplugged performances during Adjágas welcoming party at the This Land Press (Oklahoma’s first new media company) backyard, with teepee and all. Chicago’s favorite indie musicians, Archer Prewitt and Sam Prekop of The Sea and Cake, who have heavily influenced bands like Broken Social Scene and The White Stripes, will introduce them to their local scene on July 13 at the Empty Bottle. Adjágas will end their tour in New York City, opening for Jimbo Mathis & The Tri-State Coalition at Littlefield NYC in Brooklyn and have a solo performance with The Dust Diver Flash (Laura Ortman and Bee & Flower’s Dana Schecter)  in Manhattan’s Cine M Art space. Spy FM radio will have a special focus on the tour on his show The SPY’s Eye on NDN Country.

[SPECIAL NOTE: Adjágas tour is supported through the Norwegian government and Sámi cultural organizations and is a not-for-profit tour. If you would like to help provide additional support for the tour and thus help spread the beauty of the Sámi culture and music, click here: BRINGING ADJAGAS TO AMERICAN AUDIENCES. To submit to our 501(c)3 umbrella organization go here: and donate to a tax-deductible organization via PayPal click HERE.]

Integral to this tour are the friends along the way who have helped bring this together, Joe Kennedy of Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti, Ethan Gold, Archer Prewitt of The Sea & Cake, Wes and Maura Studi, Julie Porter of The Oklahoma Film & Music Office, Jason Silverman and Filip Celander of the Center for Contemporary Arts in Santa Fe, Berta Benally of Blackfire, Jim Jarmusch and Carter Logan of New York, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian, Kyle Reinhart at the Scandinavia House, Ferris O’Brien and D.G. Smalling of Spy FM Radio.

Adjágas is a well-known act and popular band in Europe, having opened the Glastonbury Festival in back in 2007 as well as performing at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver in Canada. Adjágas’ music is based around the concept of the joik, a traditional musical form which describes something not with its words but its sounds. Each member of the band brings their own personal generational and cultural memory to the songs and collectively the band takes listeners on a journey into the heart of their legacy.

For current event schedule, see the EVENTS section at top. Additional tour dates may be announced and with detailed information on how to obtain tickets to the shows. For more information and updated schedules, please contact Killer Whale PR+M: Michelle Svenson (918) 810-2368, msvenson@gmail.com + Leah Studie (405) 762-2918, leahstudie@gmail.com, http://www.killerwhaleprm.org

Today’s FREE Listen: “Hás it!from Adjágas latest albumManu Rávdnji”

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EXTRA EXTRA! Listen to Ethan Gold‘s “Royal Flush” from his album “Songs From a Toxic Apartment”

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Adjágas and Killer Whale PR+M graciously thank the Royal Norwegian Consulate Generals in New York and San Francisco and the Royal Norwegian Embassy in Washington, DC. Additional support for Adjágas promotional and cultural exchange tour has been graciously provided by Sapmimusic and the Sámi Council.

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JIM JARMUSCH PRESENTS THE CLOSING NIGHT CONCERT FOR THE 2011 NATIVE AMERICAN FILM + VIDEO FESTIVAL FEATURING FAMILY DYNAMICS, THE NEKID BANDIT, ELISAPIE ISAAC, MARTHA REDBONE AND SPECIAL GUESTS DREW NIX AND GARY FARMER

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(Click on poster above to RSVP and forward event invite on Facebook)

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New York, NY—The Smithsonian’s 15th Native American Film + Video Festival Closing Night celebration concert is presented by indie filmmaker Jim Jarmusch and will feature over four indigenous artists, local bands Family Dynamics and Martha Redbone, Canadian siren—Elisapie Isaac, Oklahoma’s The Nekid Bandit and special guest musicians, Drew Nix and Gary Farmer on Sunday, April 3, 2011 at Brooklyn’s Southpaw music hall. The evening’s free event is made possible by Four Directions Productions, Quebec Government Office in New York and Dutch Boy Burger.

NY independent filmmaker who directed what has been considered one of the best Native American films ever made, Dead Man, Jim Jarmusch lends his name again to the Closing Night Celebration Concert for the 2011 Native American Film + Video Festival (NAFVF). The 2009 NAFVF Closing Night featured over five bands and filled the 5,000 sq foot venue, Southpaw, which TimeOutNY Magazine has named one of the top five venues in all of New York City. The NAFVF is honored by Jarmusch’s kind support.

This year’s line-up for the 2011 NAFVF concert includes a wide variety and musical styles chosen to compliment each other and appease the diverse tastes of the over 100 guest filmmakers at this year’s festival.

New York’s Family Dynamics features White Mountain Apache musician Laura Ortman and creates a textural improvisational sound using electronics, voice and orchestral instrumentation. Family Dynamics features four members from the band Stars Like Fleas. In addition to the arty gigs of Family Dynamics and Stars Like Fleas, members have also played with a variety of talents, including: Björk, Rhys Chatham, Vincent Moon, John Zorn, Sean Lennon, Deerhoof, TV on the Radio & Thurston Moore. Click on the band’s full bio HERE.

To hear new tracks from Family Dynamic’s upcoming album, please contact Robert Cangiano. Press Only.

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The Nekid Bandit features Jef Johnston who takes on an Irish-like folk-rock rhythm and places forward vocal experimentation and crafty guitar work with electronic accents. Johnston, a Cherokee/Choctaw from Oklahoma, scored the award-winning film from 2007 by Sterlin Harjo (Seminole/Creek), Four Sheets to the Wind. NY Texan transplant, Drew Nix, whose music is also featured on Four Sheets to the Wind guests on The Nekid Bandit. Nix blends contemporary folk and country, sometimes with an upbeat and humoristic approach. Read The Nekid Bandit Bio HERE.

Listen to The Nekid Bandit’s “Point of You”:

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Inuk singer/musician Elisapie Isaac is rising on the Montreal new music scene and already has one Juno award-winning album from her collaboration project Taima. Her music, called “Arctic electric new cool” and “Polar Pop,” pulls the listener in with her dreamy vocals and spritely whimsicalness. Read her bio HERE.

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Listen to Elisapie Isaac’s “Inuk”:

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Closing the night will be Brooklyn’s Martha Redbone whom TimeOutNY has said “In our opinion Redbone deserves Alicia Keys level success. She has the deep funk to back up her soul queen image and live she brings a groove-heavy powerhouse of a band”. Martha’ new indie soul music will be joined with guest musician and actor Gary Farmer (yes, the same Gary Farmer from Jarmusch’s Dead Man and Chris Eyre’s Smoke Signals), who also splits his time between community activism, acting and with his blues band, Gary Farmer and the Troublemakers singing and playing a masterful harmonica. Read Martha’s bio HERE.

Listen to Martha Redbone’s “Skin”:

ADDITIONAL NY CONCERTS:

Two of the bands, The Nekid Bandit and Elisapie Isaac will also appear in New York the same week. The Nekid Bandit w/ Drew Nix will perform at Williamsburg’s Pete’s Candy Store, Saturday, April 2, from 11:00 pm to 12:30 am. Elisapie Isaac will grace Manhattan’s Lower East Side’s The Living Room stage for three nights starting at 7pm on April 4, 5 and 6.

The Native American Film + Video Festival is dedicated to indigenous production from throughout the Americas, designed to be a welcoming place for Native filmmakers and other participants in indigenous film.  In this year’s Festival more than 100 participants in Native film will be here from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru, Suriname, and the United States. This provides the audience with an unparalleled opportunity to see great new films and to be part of conversations with creative people from so many Native communities.

The NAFVF11 Closing Night Concert will be held on Sunday, April 3, from 10 pm until closing at Southpaw, 125 Fifth Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11217. Tel: (718) 230-0236. www.spsounds.com. FREE ADMISSION. For more information on the festival, visit the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian Film + Video Center at www.nativenetworks.si.edu or call (212) 514-3731.

FOR PRESS ONLY: If you would like to hear more tracks by the featured artists, contact Robert Cangiano to send you the private Soundcloud link for the festival line-up.

For Band bios, click HERE.

LAURA ORTMAN’S INSPIRED ENSEMBLE PIECE, “SHIMÁSÁNÍ” – LISTEN HERE!

Laura Ortman’s Shimásání returns the ensemble back to the core collective, yet the instrumental arsenal seems to     remain roughly the same, as all six members have apparently mastered 3 to 5+ instruments each. Ortman’s composition begins as if in a smothering fog —  heavy, slow-pulsing chords of piano, low brass, and bass clarinet glide, quietly yet forcefully, beneath a thin haze of effervescent harp sparkling. An aching melody emerges out of the gradually unfolding harmonies, carried along by the hypnotic progression until a series of muted, quivering eruptions disrupts the rhythmic stability and reduces the texture to a lone harp.

While the harp reiterates a simple melodic fragment, cracks of light begin to leak through as the color palette shifts to lighter, transparent timbres that float softly upwards. Supple clarinet and flute melodies swirl amongst bright chimes and fluid cascades in the piano, creating a sensuous wash of calm, vibrating beauty. As the music circles back upon itself, the initial sequence of harmonies reappear; however, with the texture now stripped back to only piano and bass clarinet, the heaviness of tone effortlessly gives way to a concluding sense of tranquil meditation.

LISTEN HERE! http://freemusicarchive.org/curator/ISSUE_Project_Room/blog/I_Was_Only_Dancing#comments